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SplitsTree4 recombination network trees generated from historical Australasian EHV-1 and EHV-4 nucleotide alignments.

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posted on 14.09.2016 by PAOLA VAZ, Jacquelyn Horsington, CAROL HARTLEY, GLENN BROWNING, NINO FICORILLI, MICHAEL STUDDERT, James Gilkerson, JOANNE DEVLIN
Fig 3. Recombination network trees generated from Australasian EHV-4 nucleotide alignments (excluding sequence repeats) using SplitsTree4. (a) Complete genome sequences, (b) UL region, (c) US region and (d) repeat region. The multiple reticulate networks indicate recombination events between the different isolates. The bar indicates the rate of evolution in sequence substitutions per site. The Phi test for detecting recombination, as implemented in SplitsTree4, was highly significant for the whole genome, and for the UL region, but not for the US region or the repeat region.
Fig 4. Recombination network trees generated from Australasian EHV-1 nucleotide alignments (excluding sequence repeats) using SplitsTree4. (a) Complete genome sequences, (b) UL region, (c) US region and (d) repeat region. The bar indicates the rate of evolution in sequence substitutions per site. The Phi test for detecting recombination, as implemented in SplitsTree4, was not significant for the whole genome, or for any of the individual genome regions.

Funding

This work was supported by the Australian Research Council (ARC, DP130103991). J. M. D. is supported by an ARC Future Fellowship (FT140101287).

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